First sight of ‘Healthy Streets’ proposals for Sutton

1: The Healthy Streets approach from 2019

A report entitled ‘Local Implementation Plan (LIP) – Traffic Schemes for 2019/20’ was presented to each of Sutton’s six local committees during early summer 2018. The report, the contents of which was tailored to the specific local committee area to which it was issued, outlined recommended proposals and schemes to be funded by Transport for London (TfL) from 2019 onwards. Crucially, the report provided the first opportunity to learn about Sutton Council’s aspirations for delivering on ‘Healthy Streets‘ in the borough.

Here we take a look at these recommended schemes, and consider whether the proposals will herald the start of the transformation of our streets so that “walking, cycling and accessible, efficient and sustainable public transport become the most appealing and practical choices for many more journeys” (to quote from Guidance for Borough Officers on Developing the Third Local Implementation Plan, Mayor of London, March 2018, available from our Publications page (March 2018)).

2: Some background on the Local Implementation Plan programme

During June or July every year, members of Sutton’s six Local Committees areas are presented with a report outlining the proposed transport schemes that are to be considered for inclusion in a funding bid to be submitted to TfL. The proposals are then subject to approval by the Environment and Neighbourhood Committee at their September meeting, prior to submission to TfL in October or November. (There was an exception to this in 2017 – with the E&N approval given in February 2018, not in September 2017, due to changes to the TfL Business Plan that year). TfL then agree to fund the proposals, usually during December, ahead of the new financial year the following April. This is the Local Implementation Plan (LIP) programme. (Note that borough schemes from recent years have featured on this website in posts such as Sutton Cycle Funding 2015-2016, and in our reports from to Cycle Forum meetings).

The spring and summer of 2018 was no exception to previous years. The ‘Local Implementation Plan (LIP) – Traffic Schemes for 2019/20’ report was presented to Local Committee in June and July. However, this year, with the new new Mayor’s Transport Strategy (MTS) in place, which includes the requirement for all boroughs to demonstrate how proposals will support the vision to transform London streets, improve public transport and create more opportunities for new homes and jobs, the report provided the first opportunity to learn about Sutton Council’s aspirations for delivering on ‘Healthy Streets‘ in the borough. (Environment and Neighbourhood Committee members will consider the schemes at the E&N meeting on 20 September 2018, and, if agreed, make the submission to TfL in November).

The ‘Local Implementation Plan (LIP) – Traffic Schemes for 2019/20’ report for each of the six local committees is available through the links below (as well as from the relevant committee meeting pages on the Sutton Council website: sutton.gov.uk > Your council, voting and elections > View committee meetings, minutes, agendas and reports).

3: Healthy Streets for Sutton

So, how do the schemes proposed for Sutton in 2019/2020, differ from those in previous years? And can our streets expect to become ‘healthier’ as a result?

Certainly, the 2019 LIP report mentions the ‘Healthy Streets approach’ quite extensively. Furthermore, the document outlines some background issues, and notes that schemes must:

  • aim to prioritise active travel
  • make walking, cycling and public transport use the best choices for travel
  • encourage the most efficient methods of essential travel for people and goods
  • create more attractive, accessible and people-friendly streets

The report also notes that the focus is now on improving the infrastructure across broader areas than has historically been the case in the past, with improvements considered in a more “strategic manner”, and that there is the expectation that “there will be fewer, but larger and higher quality schemes being delivered”.

The report lists schemes that “have been identified by officers”, and which “have been suggested after looking at the personal injury collision statistics for the borough, areas suitable for 20mph zones and other ‘Healthy Streets’ measures, to encourage people to walk, cycle or take public transport for their local journeys”.

So far, so good. But what about the proposals themselves which, in all cases, are quite vague on detail?

Let us start with numbers. There are between three and five schemes proposed in each of the six local committee areas for 2019/20, giving a total of twenty-three for the borough as a whole. (This compares to twenty-six schemes listed in the Local Implementation Plan Settlement 2018/19 document presented to the E&N Local Committee in February 2018. So the shift to “fewer, but larger schemes…” does not appear to be that advanced at this time).

Twelve of the twenty-three 2019/20 schemes (i.e. most) mention speed related issues (“concerns raised from residents…. about the perception of speed related issues“; “speed related concerns“; “the introduction of speed reduction measures“; “concerns about the speed and volume of traffic“; “Investigate speed reduction measures”). This is interesting (if not unsurprising), because Sutton Council’s Liberal Democrat administration has not been particularly progressive when it comes to introducing 20mph speed limits. This is despite Carshalton and Wallington MP Tom Brake (Liberal Democrat) giving his support to 20mph in 2014 (Tom Brake MP backs 20mph speed limit), and despite not moving forward with 20mph even when residents have asked for it, as was the case in Grosvenor Avenue (Carshalton and Clockhouse) [Google Maps | Open Street Map] back in 2012 or thereabouts). So perhaps things are now, at last, set to change.

Three of the outlined proposals appear to be re-workings, or revisitations, of former schemes. For example, Kings Lane (Carshalton and Clockhouse), Collingwood Road (Sutton), and the junction at Sutton High Street and Oakhill Road (Sutton), have all featured in various guises in previous years. This could suggest that whatever has been delivered in the past at these locations has not produced a satisfactory outcome. Possibly because, in all cases, traffic volume, rat-running traffic, is almost certainly a factor. But who would dare suggest that (and then act upon it)?

Talking about rat-running traffic, it is noticeable that through traffic is mentioned in five schemes. In a Wallington neighbourhood, around Clyde Road and Ross Road, it is recognised that there is a need to improve pedestrian routes within the area, “and address through traffic and speed related issues”. In nearby Onslow Gardens and Blenheim Gardens “consideration will also be given to options to address through traffic issues”. Over in Carshalton (Kings Lane, Fairview Road, Harrow Road, Cambridge Road, Wales Road) it is about improving pedestrian routes within the area, and the need to address through traffic and speed related concerns”. In Worcester Park (Sparrow Farm Road area) there are to be measures to encourage more journeys to school on foot or cycle and discourage cut-through traffic. Measures to discourage cut-through traffic are proposed near Stonecot Hill (Woodstock Avenue and Elm Road West). All good as far as they go perhaps, but is in not time the council declared an aim to remove all rat-runs in the borough? To have the ambition to deliver on low-traffic neighbourhoods for everyone’s benefit?

Issues around parking, or “streets dominated by cars”, receives recognition in only two scheme areas (Clyde Road / Ross Road and Onslow Gardens / Blenheim Gardens). That is surprising, because kerb-side parking, in public space for private benefit, is a major issue when it comes to making space for cycling, enabling active travel. So new ways of facilitating parking, as well as traffic speeds and volumes, will be a required to make cycling a real choice for most people. Sutton is developing a new parking strategy, and this parking strategy (and other policies relating to planning) will need to incorporate the Healthy Streets approach.

Disappointingly, the use of vague terms such as “measures to encourage people to cycle” and “promote active travel” continue to proliferate. These terms do not instil much confidence that anything is likely to change. After all, what is the point of encouraging and promoting unless people feel able to make the choice of doing whatever it is being encouraged or promoted? Cycling (or walking, or using public transport) has to be seen as an attractive and practical option. The schemes here are only a very small step towards making cycling appear as a realistic option for most people. The alternative and habitual option – driving – really need to become less attractive.

The new LIP3 is about delivering healthy streets. But it also about spending money wisely. It is about having the political buy-in at a local level, so that the days of half-hearted attempts to deliver meaningful outcomes, but which then fail to do so, have to be over. Healthy Streets is about the next just generation. We could put if off, and let someone else pick up the pieces. Or we could start to do it properly, right here in Sutton, right now.

4: Local Implementation Plan (LIP) –  Traffic schemes for 2019/20

The following text is reproduced as presented in the the relevant Local Committee documents:

Beddington and Wallington

Report: ‘Local Implementation Plan – Traffic schemes for 2019/20 Beddington and Wallington‘ 17 July 2018

LocalImplementationPlan2019-2010_BeddingtonAndWallingtonLocalCommittee_20180717_LIP_v1

1: Foresters Drive corridor

Improved crossing facilities and pedestrian environment for Foresters Drive [Google Maps | Open Street Map]. Measures to encourage more people to cycle. Public transport infrastructure improvements.

Officers are aware of a number of concerns raised from residents and ward councillors about the perception of speed related issues, and the need for safer crossing points. The project will also assess options for improvements for cycling, looking at parallel routes. It is recommended that the is phased over a minimum of two years, with initial investigations and quick wins delivered 2019/20, followed by implementation in 2020/21.

Note: Foresters Drive appeared in our Space for Cycling ‘ward asks’ for Beddington South under the ‘Safe routes to schools’ category (May 2014). 

2: Manor Road North/London Road area

Improved infrastructure for pedestrians, cyclists and those wanting access to public transport. Recent changes to the road network have had negative impacts on this area.

The focus will be on the Manor Road North/London Road area [Google Maps | Open Street Map], where local traffic conditions have been exacerbated by changes around Hackbridge Station. Options will assess the local road impacts, and look to improve local conditions for pedestrians and cyclists in particular. It is suggested that as a significant level of investigation is required any bid for 2019/20 would be for feasibility work, followed by a bid in 2020/21 for any implementation.

3: Clyde Road/Ross Road area wide improvements

Improved pedestrian routes within the area, and address through traffic and speed related concerns.

The focus will be on accessibility and local area improvements in the Clyde Road/Ross Road area [Google Maps | Open Street Map]. These roads suffer from significant levels of commuter parking, and the roads and paths in the area are narrow and the street environment is dominated by cars.

4: Onslow Gardens/Blenheim Gardens area wide improvements

Improved pedestrian routes within the area, and address through traffic concerns.

The focus will be on the Onslow Gardens/Blenheim Gardens area [Google Maps | Open Street Map]. A 20mph scheme is in place, but the car is still the dominant feature in the area, and the scheme will focus on improving the pedestrian environment, improving crossing points and routes. Consideration will also be given to options to address through traffic issues. It is recommended that the is phased over two years, with initial investigations and quick wins delivered 2020/21, followed by implementation in 2021/22.

Note: The minutes to the Beddington and Wallington Local Committee meeting of 17 July 2018 were not available as of 12 September 2018. The minutes can be expected here in due course. 

Carshalton and Clockhouse

Report: ‘Local Implementation Plan – Traffic schemes for 2019/20 Carshalton and Clockhouse‘ 26 June 2018

LocalImplementationPlan2019-2010_CarshaltonAndClockhouseLocalCommittee_20180626_LIP_v1

1: Brookfield Avenue / Wrythe Lane / West Street (to railway bridge)

Improved crossing facilities and pedestrian environment. Measures to encourage more people to cycle. Public transport infrastructure improvements.

Scheme 1 Brookfield Avenue/Wrythe Lane/West Street (to Railway bridge) [Google Maps | Open Street Map] officers are aware of a number of concerns from residents about the need for safer crossing points for those accessing local schools and public transport. These concerns will be investigated in 2019/20, followed by implementation in 2020/21 albeit any quick wins will proceed sooner.

2: Kings Lane / Fairview Road / Harrow Road and Cambridge Road / Wales Road area

Improved pedestrian routes within the area, and address through traffic and speed related concerns.

Scheme 2 will focus on accessibility and local area improvements in the area between Kings Lane/Fairview Road/Harrow Road [Google Maps | Open Street Map] and Cambridge Road/Wales Road [Google Maps | Open Street Map].

3: Beeches Avenue/Stanley Park Road continuation scheme

Completion of the introduction of speed reduction measures, improved crossing facilities and pedestrian environment. Measures to encourage more people to cycle. Public transport infrastructure improvements.

Scheme 3 is a continuation of the 2018/19 scheme for Beeches Avenue/Stanley Park Road [Google Maps | Open Street Map], as it is expected that there will be a significant number of proposals identified as part of the current scheme development works, which will require additional funding to that awarded in the current year.

Note: The minutes to the Carshalton and Clockhouse Local Committee meeting of  26 June 2018 are available here

Cheam North and Worcester Park

Report: ‘Local Implementation Plan – Traffic schemes for 2019/20 Cheam North and Worcester Park‘ 5 July 2018

LocalImplementationPlan2019-2010_CheamNorthAndWorcesterParkLocalCommittee_20180705_LIP_v1

1: Central Road, Worcester Park

Phase 2 continuation of 2018/19 scheme to improve the flow of traffic on Central Road [Google Maps | Open Street Map] and encourage more journeys to / through the area on foot, cycle or public transport.

The aim of the scheme is to improve the flow of traffic to help improve bus journey times on Central Road, and also improve the public realm to enhance conditions for pedestrians. Proposals are being investigated and some measures introduced in 2018/19, with completion in 2019/20.

2: Windsor Avenue area, North Cheam

Phase 2 continuation of 2018/19 scheme to promote active travel in the area [Google Maps | Open Street Map].

Proposals are being investigated to encourage walking, cycling or using the bus for active journeys in the area in 2018/19 and measures implemented in 2019/20.

3: Kimpton Industrial Park

Continue to implement highway measures to improve the flow of HGV traffic and encourage more journeys to the Park on foot, cycle or public transport.

Funding has been made available for the Industrial Park [Google Maps | Open Street Map] in recent years to continue to monitor and introduce measures to keep the traffic moving in the Park. Recessed parking bays in grass verge areas can be installed to provide parking spaces, and keep the carriageway wide enough for HGVs.

4: Sparrow Farm Road area – Worcester Park

Borough boundary / Dalmeny Road / Cheam Common Road / A24 area [Google Maps | Open Street Map] – measures to encourage more journeys to the schools on foot or cycle and discourage cut-through traffic.

Officers have received requests from residents and parents for a zebra crossing on Sparrow Farm Road outside Meadow Primary School [Google Maps | Open Street Map] and concerns about the speed and volume of traffic using Kingsmead Avenue [Google Maps | Open Street Map].

5: Woodstock Avenue / Elm Road – West Area

Measures to discourage cut-through traffic.

Officers have received concerns from residents about the speed and volume of traffic using Woodstock Avenue [Google Maps | Open Street Map] as a cut through to the A24 London Road.

Note: The minutes to the Cheam North and Worcester Park Local Committee meeting of 5 July 2018 are available here. The following text is included under Item 7, Local Implementation Plan:

Lynn Robinson, Highways & Transport Senior Engineer, presented the report and explained what the local implementation plan was.

Members further suggested:

  • Increased signage of speed limits.

Community representatives and local residents suggested:

  • A review of traffic light synchronisation schemes.
  • Consultation on parking spaces and amendments to parking bays on Central Road.
  • Removing speed humps and repairing potholes in the local area.
  • Greenery to tackle air pollution on Central Road.
  • Speeding measures on Kingsmead Avenue following a recent accident.

The Senior Engineer referred to the ‘healthy streets’ approach and referred to collaboration with Kingston colleagues in regards to the Worcester Park ward in her responses.

Members asked the Senior Engineer to explain to the local committee how the public could be involved in consultation of schemes.

St Helier, The Wrythe and Wandle Valley

Report: ‘Local Implementation Plan – Traffic schemes for 2019/20 St Helier, The Wrythe and Wandle Valley‘ 12 July 2018

LocalImplementationPlan2019-2010_StHelierTheWrytheAndWandleValleyLocalCommittee_20180712_LIP_v1

1: Wrythe Lane – between Welbeck Road & St Helier Hospital

To investigate a cluster of personal injury accidents along Wrythe Lane [Google Maps | Open Street Map]. Measures to be identified in 2018/19 and implementation to be completed in 2019/20.

This scheme (along with scheme 2 below) was agreed in the 2018/19 Annual Spending Plan, and is in the current year’s programme for investigation, preliminary design and consultation. This scheme is now included in 2019/20 programme to secure funding for implementation.

2: London Road / Goat Road

The intersection of London Road and Goat Road [Google Maps | Open Street Map] is the third worst accident spot in the borough. Junction improvement options to be investigated in 2018/19 for implementation in 2019/20.

(On borough boundary – Joint working with LB Merton).

This scheme (along with scheme 1 above) was agreed in the 2018/19 Annual Spending Plan, and is in the current year’s programme for investigation, preliminary design and consultation. This scheme is now included in 2019/20 programme to secure funding for implementation.

3: Stavordale Road area – speed reduction measures

Investigate speed reduction measures including 20mph zone. Petition received from Circle Community Residents Association in February 2018 [Google Maps | Open Street Map].

To be investigated in 2019/20 followed by implementation in 2020/21.

4: Wrythe Lane, Tweedale Road and Winchcombe Road area improvement scheme

Investigate measures to reduce speeds, improve walking and cycling facilities [Google Maps | Open Street Map].

To be investigated in 2019/20 followed by implementation in 2020/21.

Note: The minutes to the St Helier, the Wrythe and Wandle Valley Local Committee meeting of 12 July 2018 were not available as of 12 September 2018. The minutes can be expected here in due course.

Sutton

Report: ‘Local Implementation Plan – Traffic schemes for 2019/20 Sutton‘ 7 June 2018.

LocalImplementationPlan2019-2010_SuttonLocalCommittee_20180607_LIP_v2

The first three schemes listed below were agreed in the 2018/19 Annual Spending Plan, and are in the current year’s programme for investigation, preliminary design and consultation. These schemes are now included in 2019/20 programme to secure funding for implementation. Scheme 4 is a new scheme which will be investigated in 2019/20 followed by implementation in 2020/21.

1: Collingwood Road – between A217 and Bushy Road

Speed reduction measures, safer route to Westbourne Primary school, improved pedestrian facilities along Anton Crescent and Collingwood Road, improved signage, e.g. Speed, weight restrictions etc. [Google Maps | Open Street Map]

2: Frederick Road and Alberta Avenue – between A217 and Gander Green Lane

Speed reduction measures, junction treatments, traffic calming and improved pedestrian facilities. [Google Maps | Open Street Map]

3: High Street / Oakhill Road Junction

Junction improvement – There is a cluster of personal injury accidents and resident’s complaints regarding difficulty negotiating the junction. Public transport infrastructure improvements. [Google Maps | Open Street Map]

4: Gander Green Lane area – between A217 and A232

Speed reduction and traffic calming measures, improved crossing facilities and pedestrian environment. Public transport infrastructure improvements. [Google Maps | Open Street Map]

Note: The minutes to the Sutton Local Committee of 7 June 2018 meeting are available here. Item 7, Local Implementation Plan, includes the text below and suggests that the Frederick Road and Alberta Avenue proposed scheme may have been removed from the programme and replaced with Burnell Road. (Highlighted text and quotation marks added by us).

Hitesh Wadher, Senior Professional Engineer, presented the report.

Following questions from members and local residents the Senior Professional engineer provided the following updates:-

  • Gander Green Lane – currently reviewing speed calming measures and officers will be speaking to ward councillors and consulting with residents at the appropriate time.
  • Oakfield Road – traffic lights are being considered however other options are being explored this year, looking at implementation for next year.
  • Collingwood Road/Bushey Road – looking to complete all surveys and feasibility studies this year and next year go straight to implementation.
  • Burnell Road – has been added to the list of future schemes but due to priority and funding, should hopefully be looked at in the next few years.

Consideration is being given to the Healthy Streets programme and ‘20 is Plenty’ following the roll out in London Borough of Greenwich.

Members asked whether it was expected for LIP funding to continue in the long term. The Senior Professional engineer explained that LIP funding had been reducing year on year, but expects there to still be funding made available for the next 5-10 years.

RESOLVED THAT:

The proposed schemes as listed in the table in item 3.11 be agreed for consideration and inclusion in the submission to Transport for London in November 2018 for the 2019/20 programme

Schemes 1 to 3 in item 3.11 be noted as continuations of schemes agreed previously at the 7 July 2017 Sutton Local Committee.

The inclusion of scheme 4 in item 3.11 as a new scheme for the 2019/20 LIP programme be agreed.

The minutes would suggest that there was no mention of the potential for relatively substantial Liveable Neighbourhood funding in the Sutton Local Committee area.

Sutton South, Cheam and Belmont

Report: ‘Local Implementation Plan – Traffic schemes for 2019/20 Sutton, South Cheam and Belmont‘ 21 June 2018

LocalImplementationPlan2019-2010_SuttonSouthCheamAndBelmontLocalCommittee_20180621_LIP_v1

1: South Sutton Area – Brighton Road / Railway line / Langley Park Road / The Downsway

Speed reduction measures, improved crossing facilities and pedestrian environment. Measures to encourage more people to cycle. Public transport infrastructure improvements.

Scheme 1 (South Sutton Area) has had measures introduced in previous years but officers are still receiving concerns from residents about the need for safer crossing points on Brighton Road [Google Maps | Open Street Map] and Langley Park Road [Google Maps | Open Street Map] and extending the existing 20mph zone. These concerns will be investigated in 2019/20 followed by implementation in 2020/21.

2: Cheam Railway Station area

Improved pedestrian and cyclist routes to the station access in Station Way [Google Maps | Open Street Map] and Upper Mulgrave Road [Google Maps | Open Street Map].

Scheme 2 (Cheam Railway Station area) is where officers have received requests for a safer crossing point on Station Way on route to the station and local schools.

3: Belmont Area – Brighton Road / The Downsway / Crossways / Banstead Road South / Downs Road

Speed reduction measures, improved crossing facilities and pedestrian environment. Measures to encourage more people to cycle. Public transport infrastructure improvements. [Google Maps | Open Street Map].

Scheme 3 (Belmont Area) is where the new secondary school in Chiltern Road [Google Maps | Open Street Map] will be generating more journeys to and from the area so, working with the school and local residents, measures to encourage walking, cycling and public transport will be investigated in 2019/20 followed by implementation in 2020/21.

Note: The minutes to the Sutton South, Cheam and Belmont Local Committee meeting of 21 June 2018 are available here. The following text is included under Item 8, Local Implementation Plan:

Lynn Robinson, Highways & Transport Senior Engineer, presented the report and explained what the local implementation plan was.

Members further suggested:

  • Improved safety (raided table) on the Downs Road and Cotswold Road junction.
  • Improved safety on the A217 and Lumley Road junction.

Community representatives suggested:

  • The return of a diagonal cycle path, or similar, at the western end of cedar Road to the pedestrian crossing on Brighton Road.
  • Action to be taken on junctions and parking on Downs Road

Members suggested early discussions on any proposed scheme would avoid wasted work on those which would not be taken forward. The Senior Engineer explained that this was why many schemes were phased over two years.

Clarification was requested as to how schemes were prioritised. The senior engineer explained schemes were prioritised based on correspondence received, accident statistics and borough targets around road safety, air quality and modal shift.

Updates on the progress relating to these LIP funded schemes will appear in our Cycle Forum articles over the coming months.

v1 12.09.2018; v1.1 13.09.2018

Advertisements
Posted in Advocacy

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

LCC Newsletters via email
Opt in to receive emails from either the Sutton local group list or the main LCC enewsletter list here or manage all your LCC subscriptions here.
Follow us on Twitter
Support Space for Cycling
%d bloggers like this: